1. Soneto XVII.


Pablo Neruda’s XVII: I do not love you. I do not love you as if you were salt-rose, or topaz, or the arrow of carnations the fire shoots off. I love you as certain dark things are to be loved, in secret, between the shadow and the soul. I love you as the plant that never blooms but carries in itself the light of hidden flowers; thanks to your love a certain solid fragrance, risen from the earth, lives darkly in my body. I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where. I love you straightforwardly, without complexities or pride; so I love you because I know no other way than this:  where I does not exist, nor you, so close that your hand on my chest is my hand, so close that your eyes close as I fall asleep.

    Soneto XVII.

    Pablo Neruda’s XVII: I do not love you.

    I do not love you as if you were salt-rose, or topaz,
    or the arrow of carnations the fire shoots off.
    I love you as certain dark things are to be loved,
    in secret, between the shadow and the soul.

    I love you as the plant that never blooms
    but carries in itself the light of hidden flowers;
    thanks to your love a certain solid fragrance,
    risen from the earth, lives darkly in my body.

    I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where.
    I love you straightforwardly, without complexities or pride;
    so I love you because I know no other way than this:

    where I does not exist, nor you,
    so close that your hand on my chest is my hand,
    so close that your eyes close as I fall asleep.

    Reblogged from: vueltaygiro
  2. lip-lock:

    Friday, I’m in Love | Photography by Nirav Patel.

    After obtaining an engineering degree and a professional license, Nirav Patel instead decided to do ‘what felt right’. He became a full-time destination wedding photographer, specializing in fine art and documentary-style wedding photography. 

    His work takes my breath away! Every moment is captured beautifully, there’s so much emotion pouring out of each frame. I’m enthralled by all his portraits, they are definitely ‘million dollar portrait’ material. I know it would be a dream come true for any woman to have their wedding photography taken by this absolutely talented man! Please, follow him on Tumblr, and show some love!

    Previous Friday, I’m in Love features here.

    Reblogged from: lip-lock
  3. myidealhome:

yellow is the happiest colour (via Pinterest)

    myidealhome:

    • yellow is the happiest colour (via Pinterest)
    Reblogged from: myidealhome
  4. myidealhome:

simple & pretty day bed (via Boligliv)

    myidealhome:

    Reblogged from: myidealhome
  5. actegratuit:

    Adam Lupton

    Reblogged from: actegratuit
  6. actegratuit:

    Alejandro Colunga

    In Guadalajara, Mexico

    Reblogged from: actegratuit
  7. bequietanddraw:

Right. Where was I…? 
Way back in the Spring, I started my plans to sell prints. I love my job as a scenic artist, but it certainly can take over your life! Finally, I actually have a little time off, so it’s time to get back on track and the printshop up and running!
I’ve been trying to shortlist the portraits for a small first run of prints. So far, the shortlist is: 
Keith Richards (no.57), Micheal Stipe (no.61) , Audrey Hepburn (young - no.58), Audrey Hepburn (old - no.60), Ralph Steadman (no.62), Jeff Bridges (no.13), and Bjork (no.30). 
What do you guys think? Do you have any favourites you would like to see? Please feel free to leave your suggestions and personal favourites in the thread below.
As it’s coming up to halloween - and I already have some nice horror themed portraits, I’m also considering a special limited run of:
Christopher Lee (no.40), Bela Lugosi as Dracula (no.41), Boris Karloff as Frankenstein’s monster (no.42), Elsa Lanchester as The Bride of Frankenstein (no.43), Kiefer Sutherland as David in The Lost Boys (no.44), and finally, the man himself - Boris Karloff (no.45).
PM me if you’re interested, and watch this space for more info! 
(Phew!)
 To stay up to date, keep an eye out for posts on Be Quiet and Draw - The Art of Kate Meyrick and on here.

    bequietanddraw:

    Right. Where was I…? 

    Way back in the Spring, I started my plans to sell prints. I love my job as a scenic artist, but it certainly can take over your life! Finally, I actually have a little time off, so it’s time to get back on track and the printshop up and running!

    I’ve been trying to shortlist the portraits for a small first run of prints. So far, the shortlist is: 

    Keith Richards (no.57), Micheal Stipe (no.61) , Audrey Hepburn (young - no.58), Audrey Hepburn (old - no.60), Ralph Steadman (no.62), Jeff Bridges (no.13), and Bjork (no.30). 

    What do you guys think? Do you have any favourites you would like to see? Please feel free to leave your suggestions and personal favourites in the thread below.

    As it’s coming up to halloween - and I already have some nice horror themed portraits, I’m also considering a special limited run of:

    Christopher Lee (no.40), Bela Lugosi as Dracula (no.41), Boris Karloff as Frankenstein’s monster (no.42), Elsa Lanchester as The Bride of Frankenstein (no.43), Kiefer Sutherland as David in The Lost Boys (no.44), and finally, the man himself - Boris Karloff (no.45).

    PM me if you’re interested, and watch this space for more info! 

    (Phew!)

     To stay up to date, keep an eye out for posts on Be Quiet and Draw - The Art of Kate Meyrick and on here.

    Reblogged from: bequietanddraw
  8. nythroughthelens:

    New York Autumn - Central Park’s Most Beautiful Views

    —-

    Around this time every year, I get a ton of messages and emails asking me when the leaves are changing in Central Park and what the best places are to soak in the best of Central Park in the autumn.

    Central Park turns into a magical autumn wonderland in the fall.

    Let’s explore:

    What’s more romantic than 2 bicycles waiting next to trees dripping with autumn foliage? This photo was taken on the east side of Central Park near the East 70s. I usually enter the park in this area. It’s full of rolling hills. If you wander around during the peak of autumn, you are bound to catch views like this in quite a few places in this area:

    If you happen to be in Central Park when the fall foliage is at its peak, make sure you stick around for an autumn sunset. This photo was taken adjacent to The Mall in Central Park. No, The Mall is not a giant shopping center. Rather, The Mall is a section of Central Park that runs from 66th to 72nd Street.

    I usually enter Central Park from the east side of the park and follow the signs to get to The Mall. This is a pathway that is right next to The Mall. It has an abundance of trees that turn red in the autumn which makes it ideal for sunset gazing.

    Right next to the Loeb Boathouse which is on the east side of the park near 72nd Street, is one of the most beautiful parts of Central Park in the autumn. The willow trees here turn the most vibrant shades of yellow and orange at peak foliage and you get a perfect view of San Remo (the two-towered building in this photo) as well as people in row boats on The Lake enjoying the last vestiges of nice weather.

    Another favorite spot which I mentioned above is The Mall and Literary Walk (also known as Central Park’s Poet’s Walk). Central Park’s gorgeous elm trees form a giant canopy above the bucolic landscape.

    This is Central Park’s Mall at dusk on a gorgeous autumn evening.

    Adjacent to Central Park’s Mall are a line of protected elm trees. The elm trees in Central Park are some of the last remaining American elm trees in the world. Make sure you explore the area around the Mall and you will be rewarded with this amazing view of the elm trees whose leaves turn the most vibrant yellow and gold at peak foliage.

    After you admire the elm trees, take a walk around the benches that surround the Mall on the side of the Mall leading to Bethesda Fountain. I love this area because at autumn’s peak, the leaves carpet the ground.

    Bow Bridge is always my main goal when I go to Central Park to view the peak fall foliage. It’s a fairytale setting that seems to have made its way into reality. It’s also made an appearance in a Dr. Who episode and a ton of films (Spiderman 3 being one of them). Bow Bridge is located right in the middle of the park overlooking The Lake.

    It is between 74th and 75th Streets and the easiest way to find Bow Bridge is to head to Bethesda Fountain and then follow the path from there to the Bridge. Central Park is an easy place to get lost in (even I get lost there on a regular basis despite going there often) but there are signs everywhere and I have never failed to find a knowledgeable NYer who is willing to help with directions (and who isn’t directionally challenged like I am!).

    If you walk south away from The Mall on the East Side of Central Park and you are in the vicinity of the Alice in Wonderland sculpture (which is near 74th Street), there are a series of large rocks that people love to climb. The light is absolutely stunning there during the autumn especially when the leaves are covering the ground.

    If you decide to follow the perimeter of The Lake instead of going south after gazing at Bow Bridge, you will be greeted with views like this.

    Bow Bridge is also beautiful to view from the other side of The Lake. If you wait until the hour before sunset, the sun tends to set almost directly above Bow Bridge when you are standing (or sitting) at this vantage point.

    If you are feeling slightly adventurous, definitely explore The Ramble. The Ramble is in the middle of Central Park between 73rd and and 79th Streets. It is 36 acres of something known as a “wild garden”. It was designed as a total escape from the city proper and has many winding paths through a gloriously rugged landscape.

    In the autumn, it comes alive with color.

    The rustic bridges in The Ramble are also beautiful when surrounded by fall foliage.

    And finally, do not forget to walk down Central Park’s Bridle Path. The Bridle Path is east of and runs adjacent to the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir. The reservoir runs from 85th Street to 96th Street and the Bridle Path is close to the east side of the park.

    During the autumn, the trees perfectly frame the skyline of Central Park West.

    —-

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Are these the only beautiful autumn landscapes in Central Park?

    If you notice, a lot of my top views are near the east side of the park. This is because for about 7 years I lived on the border of the Upper East Side and Harlem and I would walk down to this area to acquaint myself with Central Park. Familiarity breeds unabashed love.

    Are there gorgeous areas of Central Park on the west side or further north and south? Of course there are. Central Park stretches across 840 acres of Manhattan. I just happen to be extremely enamored of this particular area due to my familiarity with it and my love of Bow Bridge.

    Quite honestly, at the peak of autumn, you can’t really go wrong with most parts of Central Park. It’s basically an autumn wonderland full of fall foliage and piles of leaves.

    When do the leaves change in Central Park?

    Great question! I can give you only an approximate answer though since the peak has varied wildly over the last few years due to extreme weather (Hurricane Irene and Sandy).

    Usually peak fall foliage in Central Park occurs towards the beginning of November. If New York City gets a lot of rain though, the quality of the fall foliage will vary. Lots of rain means less leaves on the trees and a less lush appearance during the peak. Also, if New York City is incredibly dry, the peak can take longer to occur.

    Some years, peak foliage has occurred early towards the middle to end of October. The 2014 autumn season looks like it is starting a bit early. I have seen leaves changing already and the weather has been cool. These signs lead me to believe that we will see more color in October this year which is exciting!

    How long does peak fall foliage last?

    Not long enough.

    No really. It’s only vibrant like in the photos in this post for around two to three weeks. Sometimes that time is cut short by rainfall and/or early snow. I wish it lasted for a month or two!

    —-

    I hope you have enjoyed my autumn tour through Central Park :).

    —-

    Looking for these (and more) New York City autumn photos to view larger? Here you go (click or tap on each photo to view larger):

    New York Autumn

    Looking to buy any of these autumn photos as prints? Here they are in an autumn gallery over in my online print portfolio:

    Central Park Autumn

    —-

    * All photos taken by me with a variety of Sony cameras over the years.

    ——-

    Information about my New York City photography book which is releasing in stores and online in the autumn of 2014 (including where to order it):

    NY Through The Lens: A New York Coffee Table Book

    ——

    View: My photography portfolio, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

    Reblogged from: nythroughthelens
  9. thirdorgan:

Antoni Clavé (Spanish, 1913–2005)
TABLE AUX FRUITS 1966

    thirdorgan:

    Antoni Clavé (Spanish, 1913–2005)

    TABLE AUX FRUITS 1966

    Reblogged from: thatkindofwoman
  10. condenasttraveler:

    Reblogged from: condenasttraveler
  11. medresearch:

Doctors have been recognized for using cured pork to stop a 4-year-old’s uncontrollable nosebleed
Michigan doctors who used cured pork to stop a nosebleed won a 2014 Ig Nobel prize, awarded by the Annals of Improbable Research magazine at Harvard University for especially imaginative scientific achievements.
Dr. Sonal Saraiya and her team at the Detroit Medical Center decided to try the folk remedy as a “last resort” after failed attempts to stop an uncontrollable nosebleed in a 4-year-old who suffers from Glanzmann thrombasthenia, a rare condition in which blood does not properly clot. They stuffed strips of cured pork into the child’s nostrils twice, and the hemorrhaging ceased.
Why did it work? “There are some clotting factors in the pork,” she said, the Associated Press reports, “and the high level of salt will pull in a lot of fluid from the nose.”
Read more »

    medresearch:

    Doctors have been recognized for using cured pork to stop a 4-year-old’s uncontrollable nosebleed

    Michigan doctors who used cured pork to stop a nosebleed won a 2014 Ig Nobel prize, awarded by the Annals of Improbable Research magazine at Harvard University for especially imaginative scientific achievements.

    Dr. Sonal Saraiya and her team at the Detroit Medical Center decided to try the folk remedy as a “last resort” after failed attempts to stop an uncontrollable nosebleed in a 4-year-old who suffers from Glanzmann thrombasthenia, a rare condition in which blood does not properly clot. They stuffed strips of cured pork into the child’s nostrils twice, and the hemorrhaging ceased.

    Why did it work? “There are some clotting factors in the pork,” she said, the Associated Press reports, “and the high level of salt will pull in a lot of fluid from the nose.”

    Read more »

    Reblogged from: medresearch
  12. medresearch:

Zebrafish Model of a Learning and Memory Disorder Shows Better Way to Target Treatment
Using a zebrafish model of a human genetic disease called neurofibromatosis (NF1), a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that the learning and memory components of the disorder are distinct features that will likely need different treatment approaches. They published their results this month in Cell Reports.
NF1 is one of the most common inherited neurological disorders, affecting about one in 3,000 people. It is characterized by tumors, attention deficits, and learning problems. Most people with NF1 have symptoms before the age of 10. Therapies target Ras, a protein family that guides cell proliferation. The NF1 gene encodes neurofibromin, a very large protein with a small domain involved in Ras regulation.
Unexpectedly, the Penn team showed that some of the behavioral defects in mutant fish are not related to abnormal Ras, but can be corrected by drugs that affect another signaling pathway controlled by the small molecule cAMP.  They used the zebrafish model of NF1 to show that memory defects – such as the recall of a learned task — can be corrected by drugs that target Ras, while learning deficits are corrected by modulation of the cAMP pathway. Overall, the team’s results have implications for potential therapies in people with NF1.
Read more »]
Funding: The work was funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (R01 HL062974, HD 37975A11) and the National Institute of Mental health (RO1 MH092257),  the Department of Defense, the FRAXA Research Foundation, and the University of Pennsylvania Clinical Research Scholars Program.

    medresearch:

    Zebrafish Model of a Learning and Memory Disorder Shows Better Way to Target Treatment

    Using a zebrafish model of a human genetic disease called neurofibromatosis (NF1), a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that the learning and memory components of the disorder are distinct features that will likely need different treatment approaches. They published their results this month in Cell Reports.

    NF1 is one of the most common inherited neurological disorders, affecting about one in 3,000 people. It is characterized by tumors, attention deficits, and learning problems. Most people with NF1 have symptoms before the age of 10. Therapies target Ras, a protein family that guides cell proliferation. The NF1 gene encodes neurofibromin, a very large protein with a small domain involved in Ras regulation.

    Unexpectedly, the Penn team showed that some of the behavioral defects in mutant fish are not related to abnormal Ras, but can be corrected by drugs that affect another signaling pathway controlled by the small molecule cAMP.  They used the zebrafish model of NF1 to show that memory defects – such as the recall of a learned task — can be corrected by drugs that target Ras, while learning deficits are corrected by modulation of the cAMP pathway. Overall, the team’s results have implications for potential therapies in people with NF1.

    Read more »]

    Funding: The work was funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (R01 HL062974, HD 37975A11) and the National Institute of Mental health (RO1 MH092257),  the Department of Defense, the FRAXA Research Foundation, and the University of Pennsylvania Clinical Research Scholars Program.

    Reblogged from: medresearch
  13. 24 Deliciously Simple Non-Alcoholic Cocktails

    24 Deliciously Simple Non-Alcoholic Cocktails

  14. Reblogged from: sorakeem
  15. nythroughthelens:

    New York City - World Trade Center

    —-

    I had the pleasure of taking photos of the World Trade Center for an article in The Guardian that just went live this morning. You can read the article and see my photos here:

    One World Trade Center: how New York tried to rebuild its soul

    —-

    A view from the top of 4 World Trade Center which is currently under construction…

    —-

    As I wrote in a few earlier posts regarding this photo assignment, having grown up here in New York City and lived through September 11, these photos changed my own perspective on the new World Trade Center.

    —-

    A view of 1 World Trade Center from the unfinished terrace of 4 World Trade Center at sunset…

    —-

    My other photography and musings about the World Trade Center can be found here:

    World Trade Center

    A view of 1 World Trade Center as the Empire State Building looks on…
    The new New York City skyline at dusk…

    ——-

    Information about my New York City photography book which is releasing in stores and online in the autumn of 2014 (including where to order it):

    NY Through The Lens: A New York Coffee Table Book

    ——

    *All photos in this post were taken with my Sony A7, A7R, and A6000

    ——

    View: My photography portfolio, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

    Reblogged from: nythroughthelens
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